10 Questions You Should Never Ask During A First Interview

Posted by Tim Snell on 3/4/16 9:13 AM

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You know the three rules of job interviewing:  1. PREPARE, 2. PREPARE, 3. PREPARE.  But as you gear up for a great first interview with a potential employer, you may be so focused on what to do — that you may not give enough thought to what not to do.  During your first interview, you’ll likely be asked if you have any questions.  No matter how well you may have answered their questions, it is equally important that you ask your own questions masterfully.  The interview is an audition.  And asking questions is your opportunity to showcase your leadership skills, your ability to ask insightful questions and conduct yourself intelligently during high-stakes meetings, your knowledge of the company and the industry, and your career priorities.  It is also a moment fraught with risks and potential pitfalls.  Before your next interview, do your homework, write down your questions, and be sure you avoid the kinds of deal-killer questions we’ve listed below.  

What does your company do?
Never, ever ask your interviewer for information that you’d already know if you had bothered to do a few quick online searches.  That said, if your intention is to better understand the specifics of how the company functions, ask your question by prefacing it with what you do know about them.

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Six Interview Alarm Bells that Say You DON’T Want The Job

Posted by Kurt Rakos on 2/23/16 2:13 PM

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Preparing for a job interview can be daunting.  If you want to impress that prospective employer, you’ve got some homework to do: fully research the company, prepare strong answers to anticipated questions, even choose the right clothes.  But in all of your eagerness to impress your interviewer, don’t lose sight of the fact that you’re on another important mission during that interview:  assessing how they impress you.

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So Your Job Didn’t Work Out? Here’s Why

Posted by Brian Rudolph on 3/12/15 3:22 PM

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Starting a new job is a reason for celebration which usually energizes and motivates us. We often prioritize the title, compensation, location and responsibilities. If it ticks those boxes, many professionals don’t give much consideration to the three principal reasons a job doesn’t work out.

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